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Pulmonary veno occlusive disease dog

In humans, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of severe pulmonary hypertension with a mean survival time of 2 years without lung transplantation. Eleven adult dogs (5 males, 6 females; median age 10.5 years, representing various breeds) were examined following the development of severe respiratory signs BACKGROUND: Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in humans and can be classified in idiopathic, heritable, drug and radiation-induced, and associated with connective tissue disease or human immunodeficiency virus infection Our research is the first to document the existence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, or PVOD, in dogs, said Kurt Williams, the lead author of the study and an expert in respiratory pathology in MSU's College of Veterinary Medicine. PVOD is considered one of the most severe forms of pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease: A Newly Recognized Cause

  1. Histologic features of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) have been described in dogs but without a thorough clinical description
  2. ation should be used to discri
  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic bronchitis is a slowly progressing inflammatory condition of the lower airways. It most often affects small or toy breeds from middle-aged and senior dogs. The most common sign is a chronic dry cough. Exercise intolerance, collapsing, wheezing, or noisy breathing may develop as the condition worsens

Many cases of pulmonary hypertension in animals are related to left side heart disease. Degenerative valve disease is a very common disease seen in dogs, particularly older small breed dogs. The mitral heart valve, the valve between the two chambers (atrium and ventricle) on the left side of the heart, becomes thick and defective While any dog or cat can develop PHT, small breed dogs are most at risk. There are several etiologies that can result in PHT. These include primary lung disease (bronchitis, collapsing airway disease, veno-occlusive disease, etc.), pulmonary thromboembolism (blood clots within the lungs), neoplasia/cancer, heartworm disease, left-sided heart. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterised by preferential remodelling of the pulmonary venules. In the current PH classification, PVOD and pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) are considered to be a common entity and represent varied expressions of the same disease

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) are two unusual idiopathic disorders that almost uniformly manifest to the clinician as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease as a cause of severe

  1. Background Histologic features of pulmonary veno‐occlusive disease (PVOD) and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) have been described in dogs but without a thorough clinical description
  2. Pulmonary veno-occlusive diseas()s a rare cause of pulmonary hypert()umans
  3. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of PAH that shares many features with other types of PAH but retains a unique histopathological pattern. As such, it is classified under a distinct subgroup category termed Group 1' PAH, alongside pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH)
  4. antly affecting the smaller branches of the pulmonary venous tree
  5. Pulmonary hypertension in dogs is a severe lung disease. Originally a human disease, the lung disease was found in dogs at a Michigan State University study. Other diseases found in dogs and humans are diabetes and cancer Our is the first to document the existence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, o

Rare Human Disease Found in Dogs College of Veterinary

  1. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease as a cause of severe pulmonary hypertension in a dog. Marjolein Lisette den Toom Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 108, 3508 TD, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  2. Background Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in humans and can be classified in idiopathic, heritable, drug and radiation-induced.
  3. Our research is the first to document the existence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, or PVOD, in dogs, says Kurt Williams, the lead author of the study and an expert in respiratory.
  4. Our research is the first to document the existence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, or PVOD, in dogs, said Kurt Williams, the lead author of the study and an expert in respiratory pathology.
  5. The most commonly cited causes of PAH in dogs include chronic acquired valvular disease, pulmonary disease, pulmonary overcirculation, and heartworm disease. 47-52 Primary pulmonary hypertension has been described in dogs in association with a pulmonary arteriopathy 53 and a primary pulmonary veno-occlusive condition. 54 Patients may be.
  6. Our research is the first to document the existence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, or PVOD, in dogs, said Kurt Williams, DVM, Ph.D., Dipl. ACVP, the lead author of the study and associate professor of pathology and diagnostic investigation in MSU's College of Veterinary Medicine

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension characterized by remodelling of the pulmonary venules. PVOD and pulmonary arterial hypertension share similar clinical presentation. It is important to differentiate between these two conditions as PVOD carries a worse prognosis and life-threatening pulmonary oedema may occur following the initiation of. Summary Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease was diagnosed and confirmed in a patient during life. A review of eight earlier case-reports confirmed that the clinical and pathological findings resembled those found in our patient. Though the aetiology of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease remains obscure, earlier recognition and treatment with. Pulmonary hypertension is a serious complication of systemic sclerosis and remains one of the leading causes of mortality. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD), recently reclassified as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) with overt features of venous/capillaries involvement, is a subgroup of group 1 pulmonary hypertension, which has been rarely reported in systemic sclerosis patients. It. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare and devastating cause of pulmonary hypertension that is characterized histologically by widespread fibrous intimal proliferation of septal veins.

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease as a cause of severe

A rare, severe form of pulmonary hypertension, which up until now, has only been classified as a human lung disease, has also been discovered in dogs according to a Michigan State University study. Our research is the first to document the existence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, or PVOD, in dogs, said Kurt Williams, the lead author. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is currently classified as a subgroup of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and accounts for 5-10% of cases initially considered to be idiopathic PAH. PVOD has been described as idiopathic or complicating other conditions, including connective tissue diseases, HIV infection, bone marrow transplantation, sarcoidosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell. Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease doctors found near you. Dr. Kathleen L Ryan, MD Pulmonary Disease, Sleep Medicine, Internal Medicine . 3.9. 38 years exp erience. Moorestown, NJ . View Profile. Dr. Ira U Smith, MD Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Internal Medicine, Hospitalist.

Clinical features of canine pulmonary veno‐occlusive

Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a very rare disorder of the small veins in the lungs. The incidence and prevalence of PVOD is not well characterized. There are rare families that have been described where multiple family members have been affected by the disease The ICD-10-CM code I27.89 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acute pulmonary heart disease, cardiopulmonary schistosomiasis, infection of lower respiratory tract and mediastinum, pulmonary heart disease, pulmonary schistosomiasis , pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and/or pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, etc. ICD-10: I27.89 BACKGROUND: Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in humans and can be classified in idiopathic, heritable, drug and radiation-induced, and associated with connective tissue disease or human immunodeficiency virus infection Kurt Williams, lead author of the study, said, Our research is the first to document the existence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, or PVOD, in dogs. PVOD is considered one of the most severe forms of pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary hypertension occurs due to the presence of abnormal blood vessels in the lungs. This makes it more.

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is characterized by the blockage (occlusion) of the blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich (oxygenated) blood from the lungs to the heart (the pulmonary veins). The occlusion is caused by a buildup of abnormal fibrous tissue in the small veins in the lungs, which narrows the vessels and impairs blood flow INTRODUCTION. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease/pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PVOD/PCH) is a rare condition that represents a subgroup of patients with pulmonary hypertension ().In general, PVOD progresses rapidly such that early recognition and treatment of this entity is critical Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is considered an uncommon variant of primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) that preferentially affects the postcapillary pulmonary vasculature. It is still controversial if this condition and pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) are varied expressions of the same condition or different entities Abstract. BACKGROUND: Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in humans and can be classified in idiopathic, heritable, drug and radiation-induced, and associated with connective tissue disease or human immunodeficiency virus infection Research published in the journal Veterinary Pathology documents the existence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) in dogs. PVOD is a severe from of pulmonary hypertension caused by the abnormal blocking of blood vessels in the lungs. The blockage lead to high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs, which ultimately leads to heart.

With less than 200 cases described in the literature, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) [] which is associated with a worse prognosis compared to idiopathic PAH (IPAH) [2, 3].Although the aetiology has not yet been identified, several risk factors are thought to be involved including infection, chemotherapy toxicity [], radiation. Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension with high morbidity and mortality. Impressive clinical signs and symptoms often obscure the true underlying capillary disorder, thus severely compromising timely and appropriately directed therapy. The hemodynamics of PVOD is the consequence of a widespread. Although the term pulmonary veno-occlusive disease was first used in the 1960s, the first case was described by Dr J. Hora in 1934 in a 48-year-old patient who died within one year of diagnosis with symptoms of right-sided heart failure. [] Historically, the disease has been underdiagnosed, possibly because of lack of awareness by clinicians Key clinical message: PVOD is an extremely rare cause of lung disease in childhood and presenting symptoms include, shortness of breath, chronic cough, and rarely exertional syncope.Diagnosis should be considered in patients with pulmonary hypertension not responding to medical treatment [].Based on a registry, the disease is likely underdiagnosed with prevalence being described as 1.6% in a.

ACVIM consensus statement guidelines for the diagnosis

  1. INTRODUCTION. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PVOD/PCH) are now considered the same disease. PVOD/PCH is a rare condition that represents a small subgroup of adult patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) [].The terms isolated pulmonary venous sclerosis, obstructive disease of the pulmonary veins, and venous form of primary pulmonary hypertension.
  2. The most common cause of ILD in dogs is eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy (EBP) and is usually secondary to parasitic infections. 14 Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most frequently documented idiopathic ILD in dogs, although a rare disease, and a cause of PH, which has been not only well documented in the West Highland white terrier.
  3. Guest Editorial Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension in Dogs: Striking Similarities to the Human Condition K. R. Stenmark 1, G. M. Krafsur 2, and R. M. Tuder 3 Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in both humans and animals remains an enigmatic problem. PH in all species can occur idiopathically or can be associated with a wide variety of dis-ease conditions

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (Chronic Bronchitis

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is a rare pulmonary vascular disease causing pulmonary hypertension and has been considered together with pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH), a subgroup of PAH, until recently, but is now separated according to the latest revised classification of the 4th World Symposium on pulmonary hypertension Even though the first description of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) was reported in 1934, the pathophysiology and clinical presentation of this orphan disease has long remained poorly understood.1,2 While the pulmonary vascular pathology of idiopathic or heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by major remodeling of small precapillary pulmonary arteries, PVOD. Pulmonary venoocclusive disease 1. 265450. Autosomal dominant. 3. BMPR2. 600799. TEXT. A number sign (#) is used with this entry because of evidence that pulmonary venoocclusive disease-1 (PVOD1) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the BMPR2 gene (600799) on chromosome 2q33. Description

Connective tissue diseases, HIV infection, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, drugs and toxins II PH associated with left heart disease LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction, left-sided valvular disease (mitral and/or aortic) III PH associated with lung diseases and/or hypoxi Abstract: The concept of veno-occlusive disease (VOD), along with our understanding of it, has historically been and remains an evolving phenomenon. This review presents a broad view of VOD, also known as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), including (1) traditional hematopoietic stem cell transplant-associated VOD/SOS, (2) late-onset VOD/SOS, (3) pulmonary VOD, and (4) VOD/SOS associated. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) with preferential involvement of the pulmonary venous system rather than the pulmonary arteries seen in other causes of pulmonary hypertension. 1 The condition was initially described by German physician J Hora in 1934; however, not until 1966 was the term PVOD established as a separate entity by Heath. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare disorder classified as a subgroup of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). PAH is a heterogeneous group of diseases, defined as an increase in resting mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) ≥25 mmHg and a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) ≤15 mmHg, that can lead to right heart.

Pulmonary Hypertension - MU Veterinary Health Cente

Hepatic veno-occlusive disease or veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency is a potentially life-threatening condition in which some of the small veins in the liver are obstructed. It is a complication of high-dose chemotherapy given before a bone marrow transplant and/or excessive exposure to hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids.It is classically marked by weight gain due to fluid. A DISEASE WHICH LOOKS LIKE HEART FAILURE BUT IS NOT PULMONARY VENO- OCCLUSIVE DISEASE 2. Epidemiology • True incidence of PVOD is unknown. • Usually misclassified as PAH. • Postulated to be 0.1 to 0.2 cases per million persons in the general population. • Pathologic hallmark of PVOD is extensive and diffuse occlusion of the pulmonary.

Copd Diastolic Heart Failure - Perokok t

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease has recently been recognized as a distinct pathological entity and a cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Twenty previously reported cases and a new patient are here reviewed. The majority presented with breathlessness and in the early stages of the disease, when the abnormal signs were not striking, some. Consult the top 50 book chapters for your research on the topic 'Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease.' Next to every source in the list of references, there is an 'Add to bibliography' button. Press on it, and we will generate automatically the bibliographic reference to the chosen work in the citation style you need: APA, MLA, Harvard, Chicago. Imaging description Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is considered a cause of pulmonary hypertension that preferentially affects the post-capillary pulmonary vasculature. The pathologic hallmark of PVOD is the extensive and diffuse occlusion of pulmonary veins by fibrous tissue. The imaging findings are a result of this fibrotic occlusion There is no effective therapy for pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, and lung transplantation is reserved for patients with end-stage disease. In this article, we report the development of Erg- and Aplnr-null mice as the first animal models for pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare condition with poor prognosis, and lung transplantation is recommended as the only curative therapy. The role of pulmonary arterial hypertension targeted therapy in PVOD remains controversial, and long-term effects of targeted therapy have been rarely reported. This study aims to retrospectively evaluate the role of targeted therapy in PVOD.

Pulmonary Hypertension - Veterinary Specialty Cente

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a clinico-pathologic syndrome that accounts for a small number of pulmonary hypertension cases. It is difficult to distinguish PVOD from idiopathic primary artery hypertension, chronic thromboembolic disease, and other pulmonary diseases, be-cause the clinical features, laboratory data, and radiologica Clinical phenotypes and outcomes of heritable and sporadic pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: a population-based study. Lancet Respir Med. 2017; 5:125-134. doi: 10.1016/S2213-2600(16)30438-6. Crossref Medline Google Schola Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare disorder that can be misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and accounts for 5-10% of cases initially considered as idiopathic PAH. PVOD and idiopathic PAH share a similar clinical presentation, genetic background and hemodynamic profile

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease European Respiratory

Background: Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare condition with poor prognosis, and lung transplantation is recommended as the only curative therapy. The role of pulmonary arterial hypertension targeted therapy in PVOD remains controversial, and long-term effects of targeted therapy have been rarely reported. Thi Pulmonary Veno Occlusive Disease Presenting as Failure to Thrive Divij Pasrija1 & Shilpi Gupta2 & Ryan Breuer1 & Jeffrey Herendeen1 Received: 26 August 2020/Accepted: 4 January 2021 # Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 2021 TotheEditor:Wehada6-mo-oldinfant,bornatterm(weight - 3.3 kg), who presented because of not feeding well an Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) and pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) are rare disorders, with the estimated prevalence of less than 1 case per million inhabitants. The vascular pathology in PVOD/PCH involves pre-septal and septal veins, alveolar capillaries and small pulmonary arteries. According to the ERS/ESC classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) from 2015, PVOD/PCH.

Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease and Pulmonary Capillary

Based on clinical and diagnostic findings, the patient was re-diagnosed with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). Treatment with high-dose diuretics and the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan improved the patient's exercise capacity, haemodynamics and quality of life. However, 1 yr later there was a progressive, slow deterioration in. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a disorder which causes progressive pulmonary hypertension, usually presenting with worsening dyspnoea and right heart failure. Pulmonary oedema induced by pulmonary vasodilator therapy to reduce pulmonary arterial pressure has been well described in PVOD, but here we describe a case of PVOD presenting with recurrent episodes of acute non-cardiogenic. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) occurs in humans either as a heritable form (hPVOD) due to biallelic inactivating mutations of EIF2AK4 (encoding GCN2) or as a sporadic form in older age (sPVOD).The chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C (MMC) is a potent inducer of PVOD in humans and in rats (MMC-PVOD) Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a very rare disease. It leads to high blood pressure in the lung arteries ( pulmonary hypertension ). Air is breathed in through the nasal passageways, travels through the trachea and bronchi to the lungs

Pulmonary Hypertension in Dogs and Humans | WayCoolDogs

pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension characterized by remodeling of small pulmonary veins and venules leading to narrowing or obliteration with eventual right heart failure and death 1,2,3,4; PVOD and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis thought to represent a continuum of 1 disease and may overlap Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . Descriptors are arranged in a hierarchical structure, which enables searching at various levels of specificity

Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease Discovered in Dogs R

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) was first described in 1934 in the German literature by Hora [], and with the exception of a single case report in 1941 it received no further attention in the literature until 1960.It was given its name in 1966 because of its similarity to the previously described hepatic veno-occlusive disease [].PVOD is characterized by a triad of pulmonary arterial. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a very rare disease. It leads to high blood pressure in the lung arteries (pulmonary hypertension). Causes. In most cases, the cause of PVOD is unknown. The high blood pressure occurs in the pulmonary arteries. These lung arteries are directly connected to the right side of the heart Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare and challenging cause of pulmonary hypertension. Clinical presentation is non-specific, including dyspnoea, cough and fatigue. Diagnosis of PVOD is typically based on high clinical suspicion with a definitive diagnosis confirmed by histology. Our case involves a healthy 21-year-old man who developed dyspnoea on exertion at an elevated altitude.

(PDF) Clinical features of canine pulmonary veno‐occlusive

1 Introduction. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension with preferential remodeling of pulmonary venules. It is classified as a subgroup of group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) under the unified entity of PVOD/pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH). The prevalence of PVOD is estimated to be 1 to 2 cases per million population per year Wedge Pressure in Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease. November 6, 1986. N Engl J Med 1986; 315:1233. DOI: 10.1056/NEJM198611063151920. To the Editor: The measurement of pulmonary artery occlusion.

Pulmonary Veno Occlusive Disease - an overview

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease - Capillary dilatation Case 186. Alveolar capillary dilatation of varying extent may result from the increased pulmonary capillary pressure accompanying veno-occlusive disease. Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis is probably an extreme example of this phenomenon Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension, is characterized by extensive and diffuse occlusion of pulmonary veins by fibrous tissue. ( bgu.ac.il ) Atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is usually associated to conduction gaps in pulmonary veins (PVs) ObjectiveThe authors sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the detection of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) in patients with pre-capillary pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) of unknown aetiology, and to identify the role of CT in diagnosis and therapy.Materials and methodsThe CT scans of 96 patients were retrospectively reviewed.

Lung pathology Flashcards - Cram

Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease (PVOD) is a rare condition that causes pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure) in the lung arteries. The high blood pressure occurs in the pulmonary arteries that are connected to the right side of the hear Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Also known as: isolated pulmonary venous sclerosis, obstructive disease of the pulmonary veins, pulmonary venoocclusive disease, PVOD, venous form of primary pulmonary hypertension. About. Description and symptoms. Communities Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is considered to be a subtype of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and is characterized by obstruction of small pulmonary veins that leads to increased pressure in the pulmonary circulation. Progressively worsening dyspnea and signs of heart failure such as fatigue and blood pressure changes are manifestations of PVOD Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a clinicopathologic syndrome that accounts for a small number of cases of pulmonary hypertension. The term was coined in 1966 ; prior to this, the terms isolated pulmonary venous sclerosis, obstructive disease of the pulmonary veins, or the venous form of primary pulmonary hypertension had been used to describe the syndrome Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is a rare condition with limited treatment options. The pathological hallmark of the disease is occlusion of pulmonary venules and small veins in the lobular septa. The etiology of the disease remains obscure. We report and discuss an extremely unusual case presenting as massive and intractable hemoptysis, in which pulmonary venous occlusion was attributed to.