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Linear morphea forehead

Linear morphea of the forehead (

Linear morphea of the forehead or en coup de sabre (ECDS) is an unusual variant of morphea. Morphea has an estimated annual population incidence of 2.7 per 100,000, although this incidence has been increasing slightly since the 1960s. Morphea is divided into subgroups that are based on clinical appearance and distribution Linear patches, especially on the arms or legs and possibly the forehead or scalp A gradual change in the affected skin, which becomes firm, thickened, dry and shiny Morphea affects the skin and underlying tissue and sometimes bone. The condition generally lasts several years and then improves or at times disappears by itself Linear morphea en coup de sabre is a localized form of morphea that presents as paramedian face or frontal scalp depression. The histopathology of alopecia in linear morphea is typically characterized by sclerosis and a reduction in the number of follicular units. We present a 26-year-old Caucasian Morphoea en coup de sabre is a variant of linear morphoea (a localised form of scleroderma) restricted to the frontoparietal region (forehead). The name 'en coup de sabre' (the blow of a sword) derives from the characteristic scar that indents the skin of the scalp and the underlying bone

Morphea - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clini

Natural Treatments for Scleroderma Symptoms

Linear morphea of the forehead (en coup de sabre) — Johns

  1. Hi I have morphea and it originally consisted of an indentation in my forehead near my hairline. Saw a dermatologist about four years ago and he told me morphea. Since then I have developed a line very similar to yours and from hairline to eyebrow. I have been to see dermatologist again several times and am told it is en coup de sabré
  2. En coup de sabre refers to a type of linear morphea that involves unilaterally the scalp and forehead; it is most prevalent among children (Amaral et al., 2012). Parry-Romberg syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by progressive hemifacial atrophy, is discussed in detail separately. Sign in to download full-size image Fig. 3.20
  3. The lesions can cross joints and extend to the tissue under the skin, as well as the muscles and bone. This can lead to deformities. Sometimes, linear morphea appears as a line on the forehead,..
  4. Do the lines start up near hairline and go vertically down your forehead? If so, this could be a form of Scleroderma called Linear Morphea en Coup de Sabre, a very rare form of Scleroderma but maybe you think it is this already
  5. A third subtype of morphea scleroderma, linear morphea, typically presents in children. It frequently appears as a linear patch of thickened, discolored skin on the arms or legs, but patches may also appear on an individual's forehead
  6. Linear scleroderma is a type of localised scleroderma which is an autoimmune disease characterized by a line of thickened skin which can affect the bones and muscles underneath it. It most often occurs in the arms, legs, or forehead, and may occur in more than one area. It is also most likely to be on just one side of the body
  7. Linear morphea occurs in a line usually on the head, arm or leg. When involving the scalp and face, linear morphea has been referred to as morphea en coup d'sabre (linear scleroderma can produce a scarred appearance on the face and scalp similar to what might result from the strike of a sword). Linear morphea is the most common subtype of.

Linear morphea (linear Scleroderma) occurs in a linear band, usually only on one side of the body, not symmetrically. The most frequently involved areas are the lower extremities, followed by the upper extremities, frontal areas of the head and anterior torso. If this occurs on the face or forehead area it is known as 'coup de saber' or. If you did not have any trauma there, and acquired this during your adolescence or adulthood, it could represent a localized form of a scarring condition called, en coup de sabre, or linear morphea. Before any fillers would be used, you should consult with a board certified dermatologist to analyze your situation I would keep a possibility of Linear Morphea/scleroderma. The other name of Linear scleroderma on forehead is en coup de sabre, given the resemblance of the skin lesions to the stroke of a sabre. It presents as a linear band of hard bound, sclerotic skin, extending vertically on the forehead and extending variably into the scalp (with. En coup de sabre describes linear morphea that affects the forehead. Linear morphea. Unknown etiology, favors light skin/females; onset before age 18; associated with increased collagen, matrix in dermis; may involve cytokine release from small vessel damage

Morphea is a skin condition that causes patches of reddish skin that thicken into firm, oval-shaped areas.It is a form of scleroderma.. Patches most often occur on the abdomen, stomach, and back, and sometimes on the face, arms and legs. Morphea is classified according to the localization of the lesions and the depth of tissue involvement into localized or circumscribed (limited to one or. Frontal linear scleroderma (en coup de sabre) Kenneth A Katz MD MSc Dermatology Online Journal 9(4): 10 From the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University Abstract. En coup de sabre is a type of linear scleroderma that presents on the frontal or frontoparietal scalp

Diagnosis. Your doctor may diagnose morphea by examining the affected skin and asking about your signs and symptoms. Your doctor might also take a small sample of your skin (skin biopsy) for examination in a laboratory. This can reveal changes in your skin, such as thickening of a protein (collagen) in the second layer of skin (dermis) Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre is a rare subset of linear scleroderma defined by its characteristic location on the forehead and scalp. Clinically, it is manifested by ivory-colored, sclerotic plaques with violaceous borders distributed in a band-like fashion on the frontoparietal scalp and forehead En coup de sabre is a specific subtype of linear morphea that affects the paramedian forehead and scalp, and it can be accompanied by alopecia as well as ocular, neurological, and odontostomatologic complications RESULTS: Our patient developed a lesion on the scalp and forehead following Blaschko's line typical for linear morphea en coup de sabre, while histopathological features were consistent with both chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus and linear morphea, a cutaneous overlap syndrome previously described as linear sclerodermiform lupus. Linear morphea is characterized by sclerotic plaques in a linear distribution. Morphea en coup de sabre (ECDS) is a type of linear morphea that involves the head and scalp. Some include Parry-Romberg syndrome (PRS) or progressive hemifacial atrophy, a condition characterized by unilateral atrophy of the skin, soft tissues, and underlying.

generalized, linear and deep. 2. While traditionally described as localized, these can involve the underlying structures to varying degrees, such as muscle and bone, or, in our case, brain parenchyma. 3. When linear scleroderma affects the forehead, it is described as en coup de sabre, as it resembles a slashing wound from a sabre. 4 The en coup de sabre variant of linear morphea presents as an atrophic linear streak that is most often located on the paramedian forehead and scalp. 10 While single lesions are most common, multiple lesions may coexist in a single patient, with reports suggesting that the lesions may follow Blaschko's lines. 1, 11 The lesions commence as.

Linear scleroderma of the forehead is referred to as scleroderma en coup de sabre. Here we describe an early case of scleroderma en coup de sabre that appeared as a bruise-like patch in our patient with skin of color, a relatively rare presentation. We also discuss a relatively recent classification scheme for localized scleroderma and. Posted September 23, 2009. Hi, I just today received the diagnosis of linear morphea with scleroderma and coup de sabre. I actually went to the doctor today to report a suspicious mark on my skin, which indeed was a keratosis (pre-cancer) and was removed

The en coup de sabre variant of linear morphea presents as an atrophic linear streak that is most often located on the paramedian forehead and scalp.10 While single lesions are most common, multiple lesions may coexist in a single patient, with reports suggesting that the lesions may follow Blaschko's lines.1,11 The lesions commence a Linear morphea in an en coupe de sabre pattern is a variant of localized scleroderma. It is limited to the paramedian forehead or frontoparietal scalp and may extend to underlying structures. Although identified as a self-limited disorder, linear morphea may result in extensive atrophy and disfigurement. Previous treatments have focuse Morphea may cause eye damage, particularly when it is diagnosed in school-aged children. Children who have linear morphea on their arm or leg are unlikely to experience eye damage. However, when the condition extends down the forehead and onto the face, it can cause eye involvement Linear Morphea and Parry-Romberg Syndrome . Linear morphea is different from plaque morphea, with respect to age of onset, distribution, clinical outcome and serologies. Morphea en coup de sabre (meaning stroke or blow with a single-edged sword) is a term used for linear morphea of the forehead and scalp. Hemifacial atrophy, or Parry.

Distinctive histopathologic findings in linear morphea (en

Fig. 3 Linear morphea of the upper extremity Fig. 4 Linear morphea of the lower extremity. Limb length discrep-ancy and subcutaneous atrophy in burned-out disease (left leg) Fig. 5 Linear morphea on the paramedian forehead (en coup de sabre) crossing onto the scalp causing alopecia 494 J. S. Mertens et al Linear cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an unusual form of LE-specific cutaneous condition, occurring in children and young adults. Due to its rarity, the diagnosis of linear cutaneous LE can be difficult and facial lesions can resemble linear morphea or en coup de sabre. Differential diagnosis of similar conditions along the lines of Blaschko must be differentiated from linear LE Linear morphea (linear scleroderma) is a form of localized scleroderma characterized by sclerotic lesions distributed in a linear, band-like pattern. A band-like linear induration, often with hypo or hyperpigmented areas, linear morphea most commonly seen on the leg but also arm and forehead (en coup de sabre) is characteristic

En coup de sabre is a rare subtype of linear morphea that involves the frontoparietal scalp and forehead. 7,12,13 It manifests as a solitary, linear, fibrous plaque that involves the skin, underlying muscle, and bone. 7 Although most cases present with a single lesion, multiple lesions can occur. 8 The exact etiology of this disease remains to. Special form of linear/band-shaped circumscribed scleroderma of the head (most frequently in the forehead area) with varying degrees of growth inhibition of the underlying bone, Manifestation. This section has been translated automatically. Preference is given to a pediatric clientele with a mean age of 10 years Case 1 involves a 10-year-old male who presented with a 5-year history of linear, atrophic, indurated, sclerotic, hyperpigmented, and slightly erythematous plaques involving the right frontotemporal scalp, right forehead, and right temple (Figure 1A). Prior skin biopsy was consistent with morphea (ECDS scleroderma variant) Among children, the most common entity is linear morphea. The distribution of lesions strongly correlates with the lines of Blaschko. In 25% of cases, bilateral disease may be detected. Usually, the paramedian aspect of the forehead is involved in en coup de sabre and is usually associated with alopecia and typically is found along the Blaschko. There are subtypes of linear morphea that have been given the names en coup de sabre and Parry-Romberg syndrome. En coup de sabre is a specific type of morphea that occurs along the forehead, as well as partially onto the cheek and into the scalp. It appears as a depressed linear furrow from the scalp vertically down the fore-head

Morphoea en coup de sabre DermNet N

  1. Localized Linear Scleroderma is a type of Localized Scleroderma of unknown cause. In this disorder, a hardened line of skin can occur in any part of the body; however, the more common areas include the arms, legs, and forehead. When this hardened line occurs on the face, it is called en coup de sabre
  2. Linear scleroderma - usually occurs on an arm or leg of a child. It is a long, narrow area of thickened skin. In more severe cases the tissues just beneath the skin are affected which may cause scarring (contractures) underneath the skin. En coup de sabre - this is a deep form of linear scleroderma affecting the scalp and temple. The name comes.
  3. Fat injections have been known to help localized morphea conditions. The fat may live in its new environment as a graft and may not need to be reinjected indefinitely. There is a concern, though, that the fat injections should not be done if the morphea is active. Seek consultation with an experienced physician who does fat injections

Linear scleroderma patient and caregiver stories. Linear is a form of Localized Scleroderma. It is a line of thickened skin which can affect the bones and muscles underneath it, thus limiting the motion of the affected joints and muscles. It most often occurs in the arms, legs, or forehead, and may occur in more than one area Linear scleroderma is characterized by linear induration of the skin including the dermis, subcutaneous tissue, and sometimes muscle and underlying bone. Linear scleroderma often affects the limbs and trunk, but can also involve the face. If it involves the forehead, as in our patient, it is called en coup de sabre (Figure 5), and when it.

Scleroderma

Linear morphea is most common in children and affects the limbs, face, and/or scalp, typically as a single lesion ( Fig. 3-2 ). In children, linear morphea of the limbs can cause focal growth arrest and limb length discrepancies due to disruption of the growth plate. Joint contractures are a particular concern when the lesion crosses a joint facial lesions can resemble linear morphea or en coup de sabre. Differential diagnosis of similar conditions along the lines of Blaschko must be differentiated from linear LE. Case presentation: We report a case of linear discoid LE on the forehead of an adult female Thai patient mimicking en coup de sabre

Morphea: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

Morphea that is the en coup de sabre (the blow of a sword) type causes a lesion over the forehead and extends over the scalp leading to alopecia. The patients with deeper lesions can develop ocular and neurologic symptoms like headaches and seizures and very rarely develop progressive hemifacial atrophy On the limbs, linear morphea is usually unilateral and can lead to limb-length discrepancies and possible limitations in mobility. The en coup de sabre variant is named for its location on the paramedian forehead that can cross onto the frontal scalp, with associated alopecia scleroderma [skle″ro-der´mah] chronic hardening and shrinking of the connective tissues of any organ of the body, including the skin, heart, esophagus, kidney, or lung. The skin may be thickened, hard, and rigid, and pigmented patches may occur. The two main types are systemic scleroderma and localized scleroderma. The milder forms are most often. When linear morphea affects the face and paramedian forehead causing hemifacial atrophy it is known as morphea en coup de sabre.It manifests as atrophy of the skin, subcutaneous tissues, muscle.

Linear Morphea on Forehead - Scleroderma - Inspir

Morphea «En Coup De Sabre» at the Site of Healed Herpes

Linear cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an unusual form of LE-specific cutaneous condition, occurring in children and young adults. Due to its rarity, the diagnosis of linear cutaneous LE can be difficult and facial lesions can resemble linear morphea or en coup de sabre Linear morphea of the forehead ( ) @article{Miller2012LinearMO, title={Linear morphea of the forehead ( )}, author={K. Miller and Stephanie Lehrhoff and M. Fischer and Shane Meehan and Jo-Ann Latkowski}, journal={Dermatology Online Journal}, year={2012}, volume={18} } K. Miller. Linear morphea on the forehead called en coup de sabre, meaning the blow of a sword. (Courtesy of John Gonzalez, MD.) Figure 182-3. Linear morphea that started 3 years before on the forehead of a 41-year-old Hispanic woman. Another example of en coup de sabre, meaning the blow of a sword

Linear Scleroderma - Dr

Morphea can occur in any age group, but most patients are between the ages of 20 and 50 years of age at the time of diagnosis. Linear morphea is usually seen at an earlier age with most patients being under 20 years of age and can also affect not just the skin but the underlying structures such as muscle and bone Linear morphea: This is the most common type of morphea in children. Long plaques appear in lines across the body or traveling in the same direction as the arms and legs. En coup de sabre appears as an indented, vertical, colorless line of skin on the forehead. Generalized morphea: In this condition, there are four or more plaques affecting. Morphea usually appears in people between the ages of 20 and 40. 2) Linear Scleroderma. Linear scleroderma describes a single line or band of thickened or abnormally colored skin. Usually, the line runs down an arm or leg, but in some people it runs down the forehead Linear Morphea- it spreads as a single band and seen in leg, or arm or forehead as discolored or hardened skin. It is the most common type in school children and it may extend to muscles and bones causing deformities. Symptoms Of Morphea. Morphea represent the following symptoms

Picture of Morphea (Early) Morphea is a form of localized scleroderma that exists on a distinct part of the skin. The condition exists on the trunk and sometimes on the extremities and face. There are four different types of morphea, generalized morphea, pansclerotic morphea, linear morphea, and morphea of children Hi all, 19F, diagnosed with linear scleroderma and generalized morphea when I was 6 years old. I've been on methotrexate ever since then, and every time I seem to be improving, we switch to biweekly - and then things get worse and I'm back to weekly again The aim of the study is to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of hyaluronic acid (HA) administration in correction of facial morphea lesions and to review the literature on the subject. Morphea is a chronic inflammatory disease of the connective tissue which may lead to serious deformations. The lesions located on the face particularly affect patients' quality of life and self-esteem. Frontal linear scleroderma (also known as en coup de sabre or morphea en coup de sabre) is a type of linear scleroderma...It most often occurs in the arms, legs, or forehead, and may occur in more than one area.It is also most likely to be on just is a type of localised scleroderma which is an autoimmune disease characterized by a line of thickened skin which can affect..

Morphoea DermNet N

  1. Linear Morphea Of The Forehead. Morphea In Saudi Arabia A Clinical Study Of 64 Patients. Morphea Localized Scleroderma The Clinical Advisor. Linear Morphea Of The Forehead. Linear Morphea Linear Scleroderma Academic. Morphea Localized Scleroderma. Morphea Skin Morphea Scleroderma Causes And Treatment
  2. A hyperpigmented band of linear morphea involving the left part of the trunk and thigh. Linear atrophic depression of an en coup de sabre lesion on the right side of the forehead and the frontal part of the scalp. Deep morphea involving the left lower extremity, with thickened, taut, bound-down skin..
  3. Linear morphea of the forehead ( ) By Kristen Miller, Stephanie Lehrhoff, Max Fischer, Shane Meehan and Jo-Ann Latkowski Publisher: eScholarship, University of Californi
  4. hello, its not surely due to sunburn. it seems to be something more serious than that. it seems to be linear morphea. morphea, also known as localized scleroderma, is a disorder characterized by excessive collagen deposition leading to thickening of the dermis, subcutaneous tissues, or both. the second differential diagnosis is linear lichen.
  5. A 45-year-old patient from Mexico presents for a routine physical exam. She points to a lesion on her anterior frontal scalp and hairline. Several years ago, the lesion started on the frontal.
  6. Histopathology: (S14-9951, forehead) There is dense inflammatory cell infiltrate of mostly lymphocytes in the superficial and deep dermis in association with a hint of homogenized collagen bundles. Diagnosis: Linear morphea (En coup de sabre) Investigation: CBC: Hct 37.9%,Hb 12.4 g/dl, WBC 15,400 (N54%, L40%, Mo5%), Platelet 347,000/mm
  7. Linear scleroderma is a progressive loss of subcutaneous fat with pigment changes in the skin. It is a type of localized scleroderma in which the area of skin affected appears in a band. It typically first appears in young children on one side of the body. It can affect the trunk, arms, legs, face or neck, or multiple parts of the body

Treatment of Linear Morphea (en Coup de Sabre) with

Ann Dermatol. 2021 Aug;33(4):373-376. doi: 10.5021/ad.2021.33.4.373. Epub 2021 Jul 1.ABSTRACTEn coup de sabre variant of linear morphea (LM) is a rare sclerotic skin disorder characterized by disfiguring linear depression of the frontal or frontoparietal forehead. Current attempts for cosmetic correction of atrophic lesions must be preceded by an evaluation of disease activity of LM, either by. Linear scleroderma is a type of localized scleroderma that is most commonly diagnosed in children.. Instead of patches of thickened skin commonly seen in the morphea-type of localized scleroderma, patients with the linear type have thick streaks of skin usually affecting the limbs and torso. The condition is further divided into two subgroups: linear scleroderma en coup de sabre and. Linear Scleroderma en coup de sabre scleroderma is also referred to as Morphea, and is differentiated from systemic sclerosis by the absence of sclerodactyly, Raynaud's phenomenon, capillaroscopic forehead, cutaneous manifestations may extend to the nose, cheek, chin, and neck. Facial atrophy occurs i Linear patches, especially on the arms or legs and possibly the forehead or scalp; A gradual change in the affected skin, which becomes firm, thickened, dry and shiny; Morphea affects the skin and underlying tissue and sometimes bone. The condition generally lasts several years and then improves or at times disappears by itself

Scleroderma en coup de sabre (Morphea en coup des sabre) represents a linear morphea in the forehead region. The hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome ), probably a particularly severe and extensive form of the linear variant of linear morphea A 27-year-old lady suffering from linear scleroderma of the forehead (En Coup de Sabre) from 1 and half year. What could be the management? Can it be cured or not? Management Of Linear Scleroderma Of Forehead. Read more

Presence of linear morphea 'en coup de sabre' affecting

Linear Scleroderma, En Coup De Sabre, Autoimmune Disease. In this video, I share my experience of discovery, diagnosis, and treatment of my autoimmune diseas.. Background: Linear scleroderma, also known as en coup de sabre, is a subtype of localized scleroderma that warrants aesthetic correction because it appears on the forehead region in children

Headaches as a Presenting Symptom of Linear Morphea en

Dive into the research topics of 'Linear morphea of the forehead (en coup de sabre)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint. Sort by Weight Alphabetically Medicine & Life Sciences. Bone and Bones 21%. Borrelia Infections 58%. Child 15%. Facial Hemiatrophy 57%. Forehead 84%. Glucocorticoids 32%. Localized Scleroderma 100%. On examination, an ivory sclerotic depressed linear lesion mainly involving the mid forehead with slight extension to the scalp was noted (Fig. 1). No other remarkable cutaneous or systemic finding was noted. We considered a differential diagnosis of en coup de sabre morphea, and linear atrophoderma Linear scleroderma, also known as scleroderma en coup de saber, is a very focal form of scleroderma classically characterized by a linear band of atrophy involving the frontal or frontoparietal scalp and subjacent thinned calvaria associated with ipsilateral focal brain abnormalities.. In the brain beneath the skin lesion, focal atrophy and blurring of the gray-white matter interface can be. Linear Morphea occurs frequently in young children and manifests itself (when affected) as failure to grow one arm rapidly as expected. This type is often found in the arms, legs, and forehead (frontoparietal: coup de sabre) or in many other areas. It may occur on one side of the body only. It can be associated with hemiatrophy of the tongue Physical Exam: 1cm x 3.5cm hypo and hyperpigmented, atrophic linear patch on central forehead extending into the hairline Differential Diagnosis: Discoid lupus, linear morphea, cicatraix, Parry-Romberg syndrome, systemic sclerosis, scleredema, morphea profunda, chemical/toxin exposure, lichen sclerosis, linear melorheostosi

Flashcards - dermal induration - scleroderma Sx ofdermal induration at University of North Texas Health

Linear Morphea: Linear scleroderma - Academic

Linear scleroderma is the most common subtype of morphea in children and adolescents, affecting 42%-67% of children with morphea. (1) It is characterized by linear plaques, often on the extremities, face, or scalp, that tend to follow Blaschko lines Linear morphea is a type characterized by a single layer of thickened, discoloured skin that runs down an arm or leg and also extend down the forehead. Causes The exact cause of morphea is still unknown but some reports and scientific studies suggest that it may be an immune disorder and occur due to an allergic reaction or irregular response. Linear scleroderma is a form of localized scleroderma that primarily affects the pediatric population. When it occurs on the scalp or forehead, it is termed en coup de sabre. In the en coup de sabre subtype, many extracutaneous associations, mostly neurological, have been described. A patient with linear scleroderma en coup de sabre was noted to have ipsilateral brain cavernomas by magnetic.

Two Forehead Lines/Wrinkles If the two lines are at the upper forehead, it suggests no sense of responsibility to the family and limited care to children. If the two lines are at the lower position, it means the people are not flattering to leaders and lack of initiative and filial piety. One Forehead Line/Wrinkle 1 Due to its rarity, the diagnosis of linear cutaneous LE can be difficult and facial lesions can resemble linear morphea or en coup de sabre. Differential diagnosis of similar conditions along the lines of Blaschko must be differentiated from linear LE.Case presentationWe report a case of linear discoid LE on the forehead of an adult female Thai. Morphea is a relatively uncommon disorder that affects adults and children . The annual incidence of morphea was approximately 3 per 100,000 people in a population in the United States between 1960 and 1993 . Although morphea can occur at any age, many patients (50 to 65 percent) develop the disease as adults Khelifa E, Masouye I, Pham HC, et al. Linear sclerodermic lupus erythematosus, a distinct variant of linear morphea and chronic cutaneous lupus erythematous. Int J Dermatol 2011; 50 (12): 1491-1495. [Google Scholar

Vertical dent in forehead - Scleroderma - Inspir

type of linear morphea that involves the frontoparietal scalp and forehead. 7,12,13. It manifests as a solitary, linear, fibrous plaque that involves the skin, underlying muscle, and bone. 7. Although most cases present with a single lesion, multiple lesions can occur. 8. The exact etiology of this disease remains to be determined but is character Linear scleroderma is a type of localised scleroderma which is an autoimmune disease characterized by a line of thickened skin which can affect the bones and muscles underneath it. It most often occurs in the arms, legs, or forehead, and may occur in more than one area

Linear Scleroderma - an overview ScienceDirect Topic

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